Call to Arms

Wanted! - Masked Vigilantes!

Wanted! - Masked Vigilantes!

Hello All,

Yes! We do in fact still produce products for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game :P I know the past few weeks we've focused heavily on some of our lines, but we are still working on and releasing support for all our lines, we were just really excited about vs. Ghosts (now available in PRINT!).

Our latest and greatest comes in under the Call to Arms line, originally talked about back in May!

Call to Arms: Societal Masks!

Call to Arms is a book line for players and gamemasters alike. Each book focuses on a different type of item, expanding rules for those items and adding everything from new mundane and magical examples of the item to new character options related to the item. Call to Arms: Societal Masks includes nearly 30 new masks drawn from the rich history of the real world, and an exploration of their role in various intrigues that draw on the newest Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue rules. Here you’ll find masks inspired by those used in Venice’s carnival, as well as masks used in war (drawn from ancient Romans and Greeks, to historic samurai, to modern-day fighters); in medicine; in entertainment (from masks inspired by Japanese Noh theater, to disguises in pulp and superhero comics, to Mexican wrestling); and in punishment (drawing on historic European terrors like the scold’s bridle and the mask of infamy). In addition, masks are perfectly suited to an intrigue-based game, and this book explores rules in  Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue, presenting a sample masquerade encounter as well as other ways masks may affect similar social adventures. 
  • Mundane, Magical, and Mythical Masks
  • Masked Character Options
  • Outlaw (Gunslinger Archetype)
  • Vigilante Variants
  • Masked Social Combat
  • and more!

This book is a follow up by the same author to the earlier Call to Arms: Ceremonial Masks, which also sold well and was about...

Call to Arms: Ceremonial Masks

Call to Arms is a book line for players and gamemasters alike. Each book focuses on a diff erent type of item, expanding rules for those items and adding everything from new mundane and magical examples of the item to new character opti ons related to the item. Call to Arms: Ceremonial Masks features nearly 30 new masks derived from arcane and divine rituals for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, including examples of intelligent, mythic, and arti fact masks, plus a new archetype, the masked shaman. Drawing on the 9,000-year-old traditi on of masks’ use in real-world religious, spiritual, and magical ceremonies around the world, masks in this book grant the user

CtA Ceremonial Masks includes:

  • A Brief History of Ceremonial Masks

  • Mundane Ceremonial Masks

  • Magical Ceremonial Masks

  • Cursed Ceremonial Masks

  • Intelligent Ceremonial Mask

  • Mythic Ceremonial Mask

  • Artifact Ceremonial Mask

  • New Archetype - Masked Shaman (Shaman) - the ability to take on animal characteristi cs and transform into monsters; safety from or control over spirits and outsiders; and even the power to deal with undead for good or ill.

Now, in my mind, the most interesting additions to Call to Arms: Societal Masks are the portions that relate to the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue, like The Masquerade Ball scenario for social combat rules...

But other people, like The Janitor, may be way more excited to see their favorite vigilante get a nod in the artifact section...

Regardless of your interest, there's plenty to see and love. And we have many more Pathfinder-related products coming down the pipe from our Steampunk Musha stuff to Shadows over Vathak: Player's Guide to the just released The Dread Codex: Warlock!

Lucus Palosaari, Editor & Project Manager at Fat Goblin Games (Like us on Facebook!)

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Previews of Call to Arms Line by Fat Goblin Games - Part III

Previews of Call to Arms Line by Fat Goblin Games - Part III

Hello All,

A new Thursday, and a new blog post -- only, not exactly. One of my last blogs on our old site (see this post about having to make a new site) was a review of Call to Arms and the books we'd released with a kind of shoutout to the Reviewer Extraordinaire, Endzeitgeist (see his website heresupport his Patreon here) and his excellent reviews of the Call to Arms books.

In its original form, it was meant to be one, very long post. Due to the limitations of the old site, it was broken up into two parts arbitrarily. Here, I'm going to very purposefully break it into three sections -- A Review of CtAs I Wrote, and A Review of CtAs Written by the Goblin Hoarde, & A Preview of CtAs Coming Out Soon (this blog).

A Preview of Call to Arms, To Be Written by The Goblin Hoarde

So, we've had some really great books come out in the Call to Arms line (reviewed well by Endzeitgeist!) -- what's next?

Call to Arms: Societal Masks

First up, Jacob W. Michaels, author of Call to Arms: Ceremonial Masks, has the next in the line for Call to Arms: Societal Masks -- which will include support for the new Vigilante class and other "intrigue-games" from the new Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue. This book will include the normal mix of new mundane masks that help you in day-to-day life or enjoy the festivities, to new magical masks that protect you from harm, keep your identity hidden, or just look super cool. Call to Arms: Societal Masks also includes new suggestions for using masks in social situations, going so far as to include the NPCs and write ups needed to play out an intrigue-ladened masquerade ball!

 

Call to Arms: Horses & Mules

After Jacob's book, we'll have a new one which is going to be the first in a series from Jennifer R. Povey, author of CLASSified: Hussar, all focused on horses and the gear they need from bits and bridles, to bags and saddles, to even barding, etc. Call to Arms: Horses & Mules. In this new book, the animals are the equipment, and so you'll be introduced (with full stat blocks) to a variety of mundane horses, mules, jackasses (and not just the ones I work with), as well as "magical" horses like unicorns & pegasus, as well as Call to Arms lines' trademark cursed, mythical, and even artifact "horses" for your characters. It will also feature a reprint of the Hussar class with some added features and adjustments specific to the book (just as future Call to Arms in this horse-line will include new options for the various horse-riding classes). The mundane section also includes extensive rules for how to care for your animal, in game mechanics and real-life. 

Call to Arms: Rapiers

After Jennifer's book, I'll be turning my attention to the manuscript submitted by Scott Gladstein of Little Red Goblin Games fame. While Scott manages his own publisher, he answered our Open Call back last January because he has had extensive experience in fighting with rapiers and similar blades for reenactment in SCA and fencing and felt they could use the Call to Arms treatment. While the title implies a single weapon in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, I think you'll find Scott's extensive review of the evolution of the blade and expansion to this "favorite weapon" of many a swashbuckler or duelist quite enticing!

Call to Arms: Astonishing Technology

Following up from his previous Call to Arms: Fantastic Technology and written to support the CLASSified: Technopath base class fully, Garrett Guillotte's next great technology book should be coming out shortly after Scott's book. In Call to Arms: Astonishing Technology, Garrett's hoping to 'dive deeper' into the crossover of magic and machine, offering up expanded rules for a style of play that so many ask for but few have done, and answering the question -- "In a world full of magic, would it replace technology?"

Call to Arms: Daisho

After "getting-our-tech-on," we'll be looking back to the ancient past and crossover a bit into my roll as lead on Steampunk Musha with Jeffrey Swank's Call to Arms: Daisho. The concept of the Japanese daisho (大小) is the pairing of a "big" and a "small" sword, commonly thought of as a katana and a wakizashi, but MANY, MANY other options exist. Expect to see quite a bit coming down the pipe soon from Jeffrey, as he's been working on an expansion to our Return of the Drow line....

Call to Arms: Decks of Cards

And I'm going to cap off this preview with something new from someone new -- Jessie Staffler's Call to Arms: Decks of Cards. Jessie is fairly new to the biz, but he's turned over some really great new and expanded options for the iconic Deck of Many Things, as well as well as numerous other mundane, magical, cursed, intelligent, mythic, and artifact level decks of cards!

The exact order is likely to change a little, but this covers the next six or so books planned in the Call to Arms line. Expect to see Call to Arms: Societal Masks sometime soon in May!

This blog-post was Part III in a series of three related blogs. See Part I here, where I review all the Call to Arms I've personally written and Endzeitgeist's reviews of them, and see Part II in the series here, where I review those Call to Arms written by The Goblin Hoarde.

Lucus Palosaari, Editor & Project Manager at Fat Goblin Games (Like us on Facebook!)

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Review & Reviews of Call to Arms Line by Fat Goblin Games - Part II

Review & Reviews of Call to Arms Line by Fat Goblin Games - Part II

Hello All,

A new Thursday, and a new blog post -- only, not exactly. One of my last blogs on our old site (see this post about having to make a new site) was a review of Call to Arms and the books we'd released with a kind of shoutout to the Reviewer Extraordinaire, Endzeitgeist (see his website heresupport his Patreon here) and his excellent reviews of the Call to Arms books.

In its original form, it was meant to be one, very long post. Due to the limitations of the old site, it was broken up into two parts arbitrarily. Here, I'm going to very purposefully break it into three sections -- A Review of CtAs I Wrote, A Review of CtAs Written by the Goblin Hoarde (this blog), & A Preview of CtAs Coming Out Soon.

A Review of Call to Arms Written by The Goblin Hoarde

One more thing "lost in the fire" so to speak was my original Call for Freelancers that was posted in January 2015 with the title "So You Want to Write Call to Arms" and I had an excellent response. Of the over a dozen freelancers we've since added to The Goblin Hoarde (a collective name for our pool of freelancers, that also had a now lost blog-post explaining why we purposefully misspell their name, etc.), we've gotten seven of the authors books fully published, with another dozen more on the way (see the preview post). But perhaps one of the books I'm most proud of is our April Fool's release from last year that helped sway Endzeitgeist to even consider reviewing our whole line...

Endzeitgeist's 4 out of 5 Star Review of Call to Arms: Ten-Foot Poles, our April Fool's release

So, in case you’re not 100% sure – yes, this is an April’s Fools product. And yes, I’m reviewing it in August. Sad, but better late than never, right? So this begins with a basic, humorous introduction of poles – both in the game worlds and in real life. Let me go on a slight tangent here: If you do not know 10-foot-poles, they are perhaps the source of more anecdotes and prevented PC-death in old-school gaming than any other item. They also are the punch-line of more dirty jokes than rods of lordly might – and in case you’re new school and never got see their awesomeness in action, take a look at 2 pages of long (and surprisingly viable!) suggestions on how to use these poles and potentially prevent your character’s death – you’ll never want to leave your home without your trusty pole.

 

I first introduced Garrett Guillotte long ago in another lost blog-post (find his complete list of works on RPGNow here), and he went on to write Call to Arms: Fantastic Technology, released one year ago! When you read Endzeitgeist's review, you have to remember this was the first in the revamped series, I believe, that he was coming to and he made it clear in his review he hadn't had high expectations for the book in the least...

Endzeitgeists 5 out of 5 Star Review + Seal of Approval! for Call to Arms: Fantastic Technology

 When this landed on my pile to review, I was admittedly less than excited – Fat Goblin Games has a track record with me of having interesting concepts (and since John Bennett took the reins as line-developer, an actually great horror setting!), but issues with the finer rules-interactions. So analyzing a 40+ page book of rules was not exactly my definition of a good time. At this point, I wish to sincerely apologize for this obviously less than flattering preconception. Fat Goblin Games and author Garrett Guillotte have delivered a massive supplemental book that is so much better than I ever anticipated it would be. I expected a somewhat reductive and repetitive accumulation of Technological items herein – what I instead got can be considered the massive appendix for the Technology rules. In some of my previous reviews pertaining subsystems generated by Paizo, I lamented the lack of synergy and further support for systems once established, while at the same time pointing out that this is pretty much where 3pps can take control and deliver. This book makes perfect use of this thesis – not only do we get some material for mythic fans, the kingdom-building component essentially provides the backdrop for campaigns to take a whole new scope: Instead of just focusing on one age or dynasty, one can utilize these to essentially make kingdom-building, Sid Meier’s Civilization-edition. Indeed, a capable GM can just slot more tiers in between for a finer gradient between tiers and expand the concept further, allowing you to potentially tell stories of truly epic scope and breadth. If you’ve been following my reviews for a while, you’ll note that this simple fact is something I value over almost anything else – beyond the mechanics of augmentations, the new items and AI-rules, it is the rules-framework to tell a *NEW* type of story that was previously not supported by a given system that ultimately makes me grin, makes me happy, makes me cherish a product.

Garrett went on to write the CLASSified: Technopath, which is a bit of a teaser for his next Call to Arms book, Call to Arms: Amazing Technology, which should be available sometime this summer!

After Fantastic Tech, I introduced Jeff Gomez also in lost post (find his work on RPGNow here) who went on to write Call to Arms: Powders & Dust, which was also reviewed well by Endzeitgeist...

Endzeitgeist's 4 out of 5 Star Review of Call to Arms: Powders & Dust

Author Jeff Gomez has crafted a more than solid installment of the Call to Arms-series in Fat Goblin Games’ oeuvre and while it falls short of the more refined recent installments penned by some other authors, Jeff, with editorial help from Lucus Palosaari, has ultimately crafted a fun equipment book, of which I will take quite a bunch and introduce it to my campaigns – the new material is neat indeed and, while I honestly wished this was longer, I found quite a few pieces of great material herein and actually appreciate the intention of providing the definite dust/powder-weapon-tome. At the same time, the rules-language in some cases is less precise than what I’m accustomed to, with some items not sporting the correct activation actions. While there are relatively few such issues, they are here nonetheless – and, quite frankly, would weigh heavier on the final verdict of the book, were it not for some truly brilliant gems herein that made me smile from ear to ear, inspiring stories and encounters even while I was reading this book. Particularly alchemy-heavy low-magic/rare-magic campaigns will undoubtedly consider this book a treasure-trove of pretty awesome material! Hence, in spite of its flaws, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Jeff has also done some incredible work on classes for the Steampunk Musha series, which we're hoping to start showing off soon, but another standalone piece he wrote for FGG was the second in the Trusty Tavern Tome series, Sir Reginald Lichlyter's Magical Beers, Tankards, and Other Inebrious Items.

Next up I introduced Matt Roth and his planned book (find his work on RPGNow here), who went on to write Call to Arms: Javelins & Throwing Spears.

The book has yet to get the full review treatment by Endzeitgeist, but a recent Patreon update assured me its been done and just in the queue to be released in the coming weeks! Matt and I are both excited to see Endz' commentary, as this is one of the Call to Arms books that is part of a planned series of other, similar ranged weapons. But Matt has been far from idle, instead releasing a series of Sidebars expanding the Equipment Trick feat.

And then rounding out 2015, I introduced Richard Bennett in one more lost-forever blog-post (find his work on RPGnow here) who went on to write Call to Arms: Tomes of Power, a revision of one of the two first books in the Call to Arms series from before my time. Richard's book also hasn't been put up on the reviewer's chopping block by Endzietgeist, but some of his others in the Knowledge Check series, which he helped revitalize before having to leave to focus on school. We hope to get a few more books from him in future days, but for now we're enjoying reading about his planned thesis work with RPGs as a focus of rhetoric (my own Masters degree focus).

All of these books can be picked up in the Call to Arms 2015 Bundle for just $9,99 on RPGNow.com!

Right at the end of 2015-early 2016, we introduced J Gray (find his work on RPGNow here) who went on to write Call to Arms: Ropes, which happened to get released at just the right time that it did make it to the top of Endzeitgeist's review pile, and he had this to say...

Endzeitgeist's 5 out of 5 Star Review + Seal of Approval! AND TOP 10 of 2015 CONTENDER for Call to Arms: Ropes!

 

I’ve read quite a few of J Gray’s supplements so far and, in my opinion, none have so far reached this level of quality: On par with line-developer/editor Lucus Palosaari’s best in the series, this book is a true blessing and joy to read.

The rope variants and vastly expanded options allow the enterprising GM and group to play completely new types of adventures – whether underworld explorations down bottomless chasms or hardcore wilderness survival in hostile terrain, the pulley and pioneering rules in particular are a boon for campaigns that seek something different. Heck, the pioneering rules can arguably be used to play a whole campaign or at least low-level sequence of modules. I certainly know I’d run e.g. Kingmaker sans settlement, just with characters with these tricks and NPCs to teach them to.

This book made me want to write an adventure based on climbing down a vast chasm/scaling a mountain, of running a truly pioneer-style campaign with goals like lassoing fantastic beasts and similar objectives. Want to play a wild-west-ish campaign? Get this. Want to properly play a DIY-pioneer or rope-based circus artist? Get this. This is one of the books you don’t realize that you need it…until you read it. Particularly simulationalist groups and GMs that emphasize resources and a sense of realism will absolutely adore this book. The one gripe I can vocalize against this pdf is a didactic one – putting the pioneer/block and tackle rules in the appendices at the end rather than before e.g. an archetype mentions a bonus pertaining them is a bit counter-intuitive. Yeah, that pretty much is it.

I really love this book and the options it provides, the means by which it expands ropes as items both mundane and magical. This is a great addition to one’s game and well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval…and guess what? The sheer added options regarding rope-based structures and wilderness survival are very near and dear to my heart…which is why I also nominate this as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015. Congratulations!

J Gray has been instrumental in completing the Shadows over Vathak Player's Guide last year that should be released this summer, and he is now focusing on helping me as part of the Steampunk Musha Design Team -- so expect to see much more from him soon to come!

These last two published books also haven’t had the Endzeitgeist treatment, but we’re looking forward to what he’ll have to say!

I introduced Jacob W. Michaels (find his work on RPGNow here) who went on to write Call to Arms: Ceremonial Masks, and who’s manuscript for Call to Arms: Societal Masks I just turned over to The Janitor today for final cleanup and layout! These two books make up a minor series (that may get greater expansion or at least a combined omnibus "someday") by Jacob trying to give an under utilized type of magic item the attention it deserves.

The last of the books written by The Goblin Hoarde that I had previously announced last April was written by Taylor Hubler (look him up on RPGNow.com), Call to Arms: Shields. This book endevours to be a definitive resource for all things shield in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, and we're both looking forward to seeing what Endzeitgeist has to say about how well it does that task! Taylor has also written a number of very successful Sidebars for Fat Goblin Games, and plans to possible expand a few of them into larger and longer pieces if they show just a little more interest from fans (and when school is out for him, and he has time on his hands again!)

 

And that completes our review of all things Call to Arms, for now. As Endzeitgeist's reviews for these various books from The Goblin Hoarde get posted in the next few weeks, I'll try to "update" this post with his comments.

This blog-post was Part II in a series of three related blogs. See Part I here, where I review all the Call to Arms I've personally written and Endzeitgeist's reviews of them, and see Part III in the series here, where I preview what books we have coming down the line.

Lucus Palosaari, Editor & Project Manager at Fat Goblin Games (Like us on Facebook!)

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Review & Reviews of Call to Arms Line by Fat Goblin Games - Part I

Review & Reviews of Call to Arms Line by Fat Goblin Games - Part I

Hello All,

A new Thursday, and a new blog post -- only, not exactly. One of my last blogs on our old site (see this post about having to make a new site) was a review of Call to Arms and the books we'd released with a kind of shoutout to the Reviewer Extraordinaire, Endzeitgeist (see his website heresupport his Patreon here) and his excellent reviews of the Call to Arms books.

In its original form, it was meant to be one, very long post. Due to the limitations of the old site, it was broken up into two parts arbitrarily. Here, I'm going to very purposefully break it into three sections -- A Review of CtAs I Wrote (this blog), A Review of CtAs Written by the Goblin Hoarde, & A Preview of CtAs Coming Out Soon.

A Review of Call to Arms I Wrote

When I took over the Call to Arms around two years, there were two books in the line and we've already managed to replace one of those with a new, revised, and significantly larger version with plans to replace the other (Call to Arms: Archer's Arsenal) with an expanded line.  I significantly expanded the design and topics covered by the scope of the book. This has been recognized fairly well by Endzeitgeist by him doing reviews of almost every one of the Call to Arms so far -- as such, I'm going to post images and links to my books with my favorite quotes from Endzeitgeist with links to his review.

Endzeitgeist's 3.5 out of 5 Star Review of Call to Arms: Axes & Picks

What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: Axes & Picks...

After the disappointing first installment in the series, I kept my distance to the series, mainly since I didn’t want to bash Fat Goblin Games, then a totally different company, quality-wise, than today. Imagine my surprise when current Call to Arms-books actually were rather imaginative, inspired and cool….which made me wonder: When exactly did the series and company become better in such a short time? Well, I returned to Call to Arms to take a look at what Lucus Palosaari has crafted, to witness the growth of the author, if you will. So yeah, this is why you’re seeing a review for this old pdf now. To get that out of the way: This was obviously before editing and formatting reached the current level, so in that regard, the pdf isn’t that great.

Endzeitgeist's 4 out of 5 Star Review of Call to Arms: Pistols & Muskets

What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: Pistols & Muskets...

Beyond the formal properties, the massive level of growth exhibited by author Lucus Palosaari herein deserves mention – if I didn’t know better, I’d assume another author behind this tome, particularly when compared to the previous installment. While there are some problematic aspects herein I do not consider superb (high level gemshots…), this book still more or less revolutionizes how you can use firearms. For one, this is simulationalist’s dream when working within the PFRPG system with firearms; more importantly, this book takes a thoroughly modular approach towards the subject matter, allowing for precise control and introducing exceedingly scavenge-worthy balance-mechanisms that can make firearms work in just about every context. So yes, there is a lot to love within this book.

Endzeitgeist's 4.5 out of 5 Star Review + Seal of Approval! of Call to Arms: Fireworks & Primitive Firearms

What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: Fireworks & Primitive Firearms...

Lucus Palosaari's Call to Arms on firework weapons and explosives has easily been my most anticipated so far – and usually, when I go into a book with expectations to be wowed or amazed, I end up being disappointed. Not so here. Beyond offering plenty of unique new weapons, powder-rules and the like, it is the attention to detail, the vast research and imaginative potential, and, more than that, the devotion to maximum customization that makes this work: When a given component of rule does not work within the context of your individual game, well, no problem – it can be ignored. If it does – all the better! That being said, the amount of rules that are potentially problematic, is negligible in relation to the whole book.

Endzeitgeist's 5 out of 5 Star Review of Call to Arms: Torch & Flame

 What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: Torch & Flame...

Lucus Palosaari has written a massive book on perhaps one of the most one-dimensional topics I could imagine – and he has wrested brilliance from its kindling-dry set-up. I expected to see heat-conductive material herein; even flame made into material. I expected the comprehensive, handy collection of material. What I did not expect, in any way, was how much I’d enjoy this supplement. From the firestarting-rules to the heating-stages of metal and finally, the rules for fire as a creature-like hazard to be fought – all supplemented by solid math, well-crafted components…wow.

Endzeitgeist's 3.5 out of 5 Star Review of Call to Arms: Bracers of Armor

What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: Bracers of Armor...

Lucus Palosaari’s bracers are a briefer CtA-installment and they manage to begin with interesting ideas, the optional rules for archer-bracers, e.g., making for a cool rules-addition for low fantasy. That being said…and as much as I’m loathe to say it…this installment, is comparatively uninspired. Sure, the bracers duplicating different armors make sense…and yes, I like the fluff-change of bracers – but when compared to e.g. the fireworks book, the options provided herein simply…aren’t as evocative, as unique. In fact, the magic armor-bracers may have great fluff, but rules-wise, they are not that intriguing. Now granted, this is an inexpensive book compared to the last huge CtA-installments…but ultimately, it also feels like it doesn’t reach even half as far. In the intelligent item, one can see a bit of the playful precision with which he usually puts out those unique concepts and stitches holes in the rules…but apart from them, this pdf felt like a solid one…but one, which, in direct comparison to e.g. the firework book, fell flat of its own premise.

Endzeitgeist's 5 Out of 5 Star Review + Seal of Approval + ENZ Essentials Listing of Call to Arms: The Magic Satchel

What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: The Magic Satchel...

Lucus Palosaari’s magic satchels…are BRILLIANT. I’m not even going to try to slowly lead into this. Magic Satchels as envisioned here are exactly what I always wanted – this book pretty much looks and feels almost like it was written for me. This streamlines the extensive shopping trips and planning required in simulationalist gameplay without sacrificing the need for planning in advance; this provides almost the ease of GM-handwaving encumbrance and actually creates suspense: The cheers when players draw forth the third stake they needed on a hard skill-check…is glorious and adds actually a fun, novel component to the gameplay…and all without falling into the innumerable pits and traps this type of design sports: From weight to scarcity to even a simpler system, this book covers ALL basics in its deceptively few pages.

Endzeitgeist's 5 out of 5 Star Review + his Seal of Approval! of Call to Arms: Mantles of Power

What Endzeitgeist had to say about CtA: Mantles of Power...

Lucus Palosaari delivers essentially a bait and switch pdf – I went into this book expecting an array of magic mantles…and they’re in here. But this book is so much more. The notion of mantles as a social structuring element is a brilliant “why has this not been done before?”-moment that made me cackle with glee. Obviously, I went into the mantles of power-section rather skeptical – the obvious power-increase being just nasty…but know what? This section is x campaigns and villains waiting to happen. The brilliant horsemen mantles will be wielded by champions of darkness in my game (or by the players…we’ll see…) and then, there would be the fey-mantles.

And thus concludes Part I of the Review of Call to Arms book line. See Part II here, or Part III, the Preview, here.

Lucus Palosaari, Editor & Project Manager at Fat Goblin Games (Like us on Facebook!)

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