Starfinder

Incoming Transmission -- Alien Evolution: Cosmic Race Guide Coming Soon

Incoming Transmission -- Alien Evolution: Cosmic Race Guide Coming Soon

Hello All,

I mentioned this book awhile ago talking about our Starfinder Roleplaying Game compatible products, but its almost ready!

Alien Evolutions is a line of books intended to bring outlandish alien creatures to life in your game. Each book will explore myriad topics regarding creatures from distant planets, whether that be playable races, monsters to encounter, world descriptions, or various other things related.

The Cosmic Race Guide is a book intended to give the GM and players 25 new playable races with unique physiologies and abilities. These creatures are artwork inspired by the late Jack Kirby’s wonderful work in comics. Creatures from the aerial Abrial to the free-floating-nervous- system-encased-in-armor Uavaryon should present something enticing for anyone to play. Take a look inside at the colorful, comic inspired creatures!

 

August 28th, 2017 would have been the 100th birthday of Jack Kirby. Being the fans of various kinds of nerdery that The Fattest Goblin Himself is, Rick Hershey decided that he wanted to do an homage of sorts to the late, great comic legend. The Goblin Hoarde, Rick’s stable of writers and editors, fully supported this and immediately commenced on pontificating about their favorite Jack Kirby creations (and co-creations). Eventually he just said, “Ok, we’re doing it!” and Alien Evolutions: Cosmic Race Guide was born.

The release of the Starfinder Core Rulebook also came and made a natural arena for the development of this book and the creatures further in. Astute readers will definitely be able to see the inspiration from the various Jack Kirby creations, fans of science-fiction and science-fantasy should see some of their favorite literary and small screen species show up in some form or another. The genre(s) are vast and these 25 creatures are far from representative of all of them, we’d love to hear from readers what creatures you want to see in a future installment!

When you see images like these though, its hard not to be inspired:

&

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The task fell to Kiel Howell, whom did the well-received Cosmic Odyssey: Service Bots & Synthetic Companions, though Rick, Troy, and myself all had a hand or three in these.

Regardless, we hope you'll enjoy these 25 new additions to the Starfinder Roleplaying Game!

Lucus Palosaari on DriveThruRPGFacebookTwitterGoogle+ & LinkedIn -- and now on Amazon!

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Goblin’s Guide to Build Points in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game

Goblin’s Guide to Build Points in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game

“But how much does it cost in credits?”

Hi everybody! It's your special guest blogger, 8-Bit Ben (from the 8-Bit WedNESday blogs!) I'm here to do some shaky math, and try to tackle Build Points (BP) in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game, and how many credits they're worth.

I've been following the Starfinder Roleplaying Game as a product since it was announced. I've written an 8-Bit Adventure for the system, which is currently in the editing process. I'm also part of several social media groups talking about this game. One of the most common questions from these groups is: “How much is a build point worth?”

Credits vs. BP

Let's start with credits. In the Starfinder Roleplaying Game all currency is called a “credit.” This may be physical money like gold coins, rare gems, or credsticks; or it may be digital cash in a planetary banking system. No matter how you get paid, it all ends up as credits. You, as your character, gain credits by doing jobs, stealing, selling salvaged goods, and other sources.

As characters level up, they gain access to Build Points, based on the party’s Average Party Level (APL). The APL is equal to what Tier of starship they can own, and therefore, how many BP the party has access to, to purchase ship components. As an example, a party of four 1st level characters have an APL of 1. This means they can have a Tier 1 starship, which has a BP limit of 55. Keep that in mind, this is going to be the example I keep going back to.

Exchange Rates

To figure out how much a BP is worth in credits, we’re going to have to do some searching through the Starfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook, and some basic math. I'll do some of this for you. I'm sure your greedy players will do the math for you too.

Example 1:

As a PC, you can buy a computer with a security module that adds a +1 to the DC to hack into the computer. Security modules cost 25% of the base cost of the computer, meaning they range in price from T1 security module being 12.5 credits to a T10 security module being 80,000 credits. As a starship component, you can buy Mk1 Mononode, which provides a +1 bonus to skill check. The Mk1 Mononode costs 1 BP.

So, for our first example of roughly equivalent technology, 1 BP can range between 12.5 - 80,000 credits. We’re no closer to pinning down exactly how much a BP is worth in currency.

This means our sample ship for a 1st level party ranges between 687.5 to 4.4 million credits.

Example 2:

A PC can buy an Estes Suit 1 armor, which gives them a + 1 KAC (Kinetic Armor Class), for 410 credits. While it's not an exact correlation, a starship can buy a Mk1 Defense, which gives the ship a +1 to TL (Target Lock-On).

In this case, a BP is worth 205 credits (410 credits / 2BP = 205 credits). Now our 55 BP starship is worth 11,275 credits.

Example 3:

This one’s going to be a little more complex, as we start comparing weapons. Let's start with the starship. You can buy a gyrolaser for 3 BP, which does 1d8 starship damage (max 80 damage against PCs). You can also buy a light laser cannon, which deals 2d4 starship damage (max 80 damage against PCs) for 2 BP. Both of these weapons are available to a Tier 1 starship (and therefor Level 1 PCs). The damage output is the important part here. As a PC (at level 20), you can buy a zenith artillery laser, which deals 9d8 F (max 72 fire damage) for 722,000 credits. Or, (at level 17) you could buy an elite reaction cannon, which deals 8d10 B (max 80 bludgeoning) damage. As you can see, we’re trying to compare firepower here.

The ship’s light laser would be 240,666 to 361,000 credits (244,000 / 2 or 722,000 / 2). The gyrolaser would cost between 81,333 and 122,000 credits (244,000 / 3 or 722,000 /3).

That's a pretty huge array of cost for our 1st level party’s ship. At 55 BP, these four price points would equal 4,473,315 credits, 6,710,000 credits, 13,236,630 credits, or 19,855,000 credits.

Wow! So, a Tier 1 starship could cost anywhere between 11,275 to 19,855,000 credits depending on what system you're basing your price on? Is there ANY way to narrow this down? Well, yes and no. Let's take a look at some “real world” prices.

“Real World Prices”

According to this CNN article, the United States Army spends around $430,000 - $900,000 for armored personnel vehicles.

Wikipedia says an Apache attack helicopter costs $35.5 million.

According to this Quora article, a United States Navy nuclear submarine runs roughly $4.5 BILLION to build.

My 2 Credits

There's no solid conversion rate between credits and build points. That's just not how this game was designed. IF you insist on having a conversion rate, I would personally go by one of the weapon’s rates. I think starships should be extremely expensive. The Starfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook states that:

“Whether it was built from scrap, received from a generous benefactor, or purchased with an exorbitant loan, the PC’s starship serves as a mobile base of operations…”

In my mind, that tells me these ships are expensive, and should be treated that way. Knowing your players, would they sell off a starship to get rich quick? What happens if they don't actually own that ship? What if they're leasing it from a mega-corporation? What if it's a military or government vehicle? The true owners of that vessel will likely want to have words with them.

But, hey, that's just my 2 credits.

Your headache-suffering GM,

Ben Dowell

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Goblin’s Guide to Build Points in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game

Goblin’s Guide to Build Points in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game

“But how much does it cost in credits?”

Hi everybody! It's your special guest blogger, 8-Bit Ben (from the 8-Bit WedNESday blogs!) I'm here to do some shaky math, and try to tackle Build Points (BP) in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game, and how many credits they're worth.

I've been following the Starfinder Roleplaying Game as a product since it was announced. I've written an 8-Bit Adventure for the system, which is currently in the editing process. I'm also part of several social media groups talking about this game. One of the most common questions from these groups is: “How much is a build point worth?”

Credits vs. BP

Let's start with credits. In the Starfinder Roleplaying Game all currency is called a “credit.” This may be physical money like gold coins, rare gems, or credsticks; or it may be digital cash in a planetary banking system. No matter how you get paid, it all ends up as credits. You, as your character, gain credits by doing jobs, stealing, selling salvaged goods, and other sources.

As characters level up, they gain access to Build Points, based on the party’s Average Party Level (APL). The APL is equal to what Tier of starship they can own, and therefore, how many BP the party has access to, to purchase ship components. As an example, a party of four 1st level characters have an APL of 1. This means they can have a Tier 1 starship, which has a BP limit of 55. Keep that in mind, this is going to be the example I keep going back to.

Exchange Rates

To figure out how much a BP is worth in credits, we’re going to have to do some searching through the Starfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook, and some basic math. I'll do some of this for you. I'm sure your greedy players will do the math for you too.

Example 1:

As a PC, you can buy a computer with a security module that adds a +1 to the DC to hack into the computer. Security modules cost 25% of the base cost of the computer, meaning they range in price from T1 security module being 12.5 credits to a T10 security module being 80,000 credits. As a starship component, you can buy Mk1 Mononode, which provides a +1 bonus to skill check. The Mk1 Mononode costs 1 BP.

So, for our first example of roughly equivalent technology, 1 BP can range between 12.5 - 80,000 credits. We’re no closer to pinning down exactly how much a BP is worth in currency.

This means our sample ship for a 1st level party ranges between 687.5 to 4.4 million credits.

Example 2:

A PC can buy an Estes Suit 1 armor, which gives them a + 1 KAC (Kinetic Armor Class), for 410 credits. While it's not an exact correlation, a starship can buy a Mk1 Defense, which gives the ship a +1 to TL (Target Lock-On).

In this case, a BP is worth 205 credits (410 credits / 2BP = 205 credits). Now our 55 BP starship is worth 11,275 credits.

Example 3:

This one’s going to be a little more complex, as we start comparing weapons. Let's start with the starship. You can buy a gyrolaser for 3 BP, which does 1d8 starship damage (max 80 damage against PCs). You can also buy a light laser cannon, which deals 2d4 starship damage (max 80 damage against PCs) for 2 BP. Both of these weapons are available to a Tier 1 starship (and therefor Level 1 PCs). The damage output is the important part here. As a PC (at level 20), you can buy a zenith artillery laser, which deals 9d8 F (max 72 fire damage) for 722,000 credits. Or, (at level 17) you could buy an elite reaction cannon, which deals 8d10 B (max 80 bludgeoning) damage. As you can see, we’re trying to compare firepower here.

The ship’s light laser would be 240,666 to 361,000 credits (244,000 / 2 or 722,000 / 2). The gyrolaser would cost between 81,333 and 122,000 credits (244,000 / 3 or 722,000 /3).

That's a pretty huge array of cost for our 1st level party’s ship. At 55 BP, these four price points would equal 4,473,315 credits, 6,710,000 credits, 13,236,630 credits, or 19,855,000 credits.

Wow! So, a Tier 1 starship could cost anywhere between 11,275 to 19,855,000 credits depending on what system you're basing your price on? Is there ANY way to narrow this down? Well, yes and no. Let's take a look at some “real world” prices.

“Real World Prices”

According to this CNN article, the United States Army spends around $430,000 - $900,000 for armored personnel vehicles.

Wikipedia says an Apache attack helicopter costs $35.5 million.

According to this Quora article, a United States Navy nuclear submarine runs roughly $4.5 BILLION to build.

My 2 Credits

There's no solid conversion rate between credits and build points. That's just not how this game was designed. IF you insist on having a conversion rate, I would personally go by one of the weapon’s rates. I think starships should be extremely expensive. The Starfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook states that:

“Whether it was built from scrap, received from a generous benefactor, or purchased with an exorbitant loan, the PC’s starship serves as a mobile base of operations…”

In my mind, that tells me these ships are expensive, and should be treated that way. Knowing your players, would they sell off a starship to get rich quick? What happens if they don't actually own that ship? What if they're leasing it from a mega-corporation? What if it's a military or government vehicle? The true owners of that vessel will likely want to have words with them.

But, hey, that's just my 2 credits.

Your headache-suffering GM,

Ben Dowell

Read more →

First Release in New Starfinder Roleplaying Game Line -- Wonders of the Cosmos: Fine & Diminutive Starships!

First Release in New Starfinder Roleplaying Game Line -- Wonders of the Cosmos: Fine & Diminutive Starships!

Hello All,

Over a month ago we announced the following but didn't reveal the name because we weren't sure the varying size categories of starship combat were "public knowledge" yet. But with Starfinder Roleplaying Game released for just a week -- we wonder if others were seeing the same problem we were: the missing sizes!

Wonders of the Cosmos: Fine & Diminutive Starships!

Though she be but little, she is fierce.

Escape in a lifeboat, fly a motorcycle through space, or come across ships built for a 1  foot-tall species — in Wonders of the Cosmos: Fine & Diminutive Starships!

Each Wonders of the Cosmos attempts to give players and gamemasters some new and wondrous addition to the Starfinder Roleplaying Game in a single, small volume. Be it a new world to explore, a new subsystem to exploit, or just rules clarifications and ideas for how to make something work in the Starfinder Roleplaying Game, the design of each Wonders of the Cosmos is to provide just enough material to help you add the element to your game.

In Wonders of the Cosmos: Fine & Diminutive Starships, we explore the two “missing “size classes of starships from the chart — Fine & Diminutive. With Tiny starships beginning at least 20 feet long and weighing over 3 tons, plenty of room exists for accounting for even smaller ships or objects — be they jettisoned escape pods drifting through space, remote controlled drone ships without living occupants, or even just scaled down ships for Tiny or smaller races!

Most books don't try to explain why they exist in their introductions but we felt it made a lot of sense for this book, and we figure we'll share it here:

Why Include Fine & Diminutive Starships?

The “barely-able-to-fit-one-pilot” fighter ship, or an “indestructible starship.” and the “last hope of insert-species-here” are all common tropes that is used in science fiction (and similar against the odds situations in other genres) that is often representative of the culmination of “The Hero’s Journey” in a story. The farmer turned hero in a moon sized space station’s central trench, the hero aboard their specially equipped star fighter, or a certain tougher than nails heroine inside her very small fighter, each of these heroes bet against the odds in their woefully small vehicle to take on almost incalculably larger vessels (or even armadas) and win. The Starfinder Roleplaying Game includes starships from Tiny to Colossal in Chapter 9 in the Building Starships section of the Starfinder Core Rulebook. This unfortunately does not give options for Fine or Diminutive sized ships, such as a spy ship or a ship scaled for pixies. Lifeboats and escape pods would also be encompassed under the Fine and Diminutive sizes and are mentioned in the Starfinder Core Rulebook but they aren’t statted up (as they don’t really have any combat value) but that is exactly the size of starship you’d want if you plan on living out the dream of making a heroic bombing run against a massive capital ship or sneaking aboard an enemy starship in a nigh undetectable vehicle.

Another scenario that is currently somewhat not possible is a starship providing cover fire for troops on the ground or something like a small starship with wings the shape of an “X” taking out a huge walking vehicle on the ground. In Chapter 9, under the Building Starships section of the Starfinder Core Rulebook, the Shooting Starships sidebar explicitly calls out that starships and PC weapons are not meant to interact and that starship weapons are never precise enough to target a single creature or even a small group of them. Fine and Diminutive ships are meant to bridge that gap, allowing for some damage (or high damage if you are configured as a bomber) against starships, targeting non-starship vehicles, and directly target a small area around a creature to cause either direct or splash damage (and potentially knocking the creature prone or other conditions).

You can pick up this Wonders of the Cosmos book today on DriveThruRPG or RPGNow today, or soon on other platforms, and also from Kiel Howell and now available is his other foray into the Starfinder Roleplaying Game -- Cosmic Odyssey: Service Bots & Synthetic Companions!

Lucus Palosaari on DriveThruRPGFacebookTwitterGoogle+ & LinkedIn -- and now on Amazon!

 

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Cosmic Odysseys Line of Starfinder Roleplaying Game Books -- Pirates & Robots!

Cosmic Odysseys Line of Starfinder Roleplaying Game Books -- Pirates & Robots!

Hello All,

Previously we showed off the covers of these two books, but with the release of the Starfinder Roleplaying Game from Paizo Publishing today at Gen Con (AND THEY'VE ALREADY SOLD OUT!) -- we can officially share some previews of our first two fully Starfinder Roleplaying Game Compatible products!

For more products see my older blogs, or see our DriveThruRPG.com page!

Cosmic Odyssey: Pirates of the Starstream

Join us on a voyage among the stars for Cosmic Odyssey: Pirates of the Starstream!

Cosmic Odyssey is a line of Starfinder Roleplaying Game compatible products designed to give you, as both a player and as a gamemaster, all the tools you need to fully explore a classic motif of science fiction with new character options, equipment and vessels, as well as a location and NPCs. Designed to be dropped into your existing game, or to serve as a starting point for your adventures, each Cosmic Odyssey is ready-made for action. In Pirates of the Starstream we bring you to 8-Pieces Port, a safe haven to criminals that caters to the corsairs and buccaneers of the spaceways. Included in this book are new themes such as the brute and rogue, new drone options for mechanics, a new spell, new equipment for boarding and ramming, new sample starships like the gunboat, and several NPCs for you to drop into your campaign.

Kim Frandsen brings some great options to help you play as proper space pirates, while also detailing three different interesting groups that frequent the "Tortuga-in-Space" of 8-Pieces Port!

But in addition to 6+ NPCs stat'd out for use in your game, we also realized there weren't clear rules for how to ram a ship, breach its hull, and capture it -- like a space pirate would need to!

Along with a host of other "needed" bits and pieces to help you feel like you're really playing as -- or against -- SPACE PIRATES!

Cosmic Odyssey: Service Bots & Synthetic Companions

I'm completely operational, and all my circuits are functioning perfectly — how may I serve you today?

Who doesn’t want a robotic sidekick to join them as they traverse the stars? Well, Cosmic Odyssey: Service Bots & Synthetic Companions has you covered!

Cosmic Odyssey is a line of Starfinder Roleplaying Game compatible products designed to give you, as both a player and as a gamemaster, all the tools you need to fully explore a classic motif of science fiction with new character options, equipment, and vessels, as well as a location and NPCs. Designed to be dropped into your existing game, or to serve as a starting point for your adventures, each Cosmic Odyssey is ready-made for action. In Service Bots & Synthetic Companions, we bring you all the rules you need for building your very own robot pal as well as several pre-made Service Bots, or SBs. These synthetic companions exist in a space outside the fully-autonomous android race and the advanced machine companions of the mechanic class’s drones. Instead, our SBs are robotic companions for everyone (that can afford them). And, rather than just generic rules, an entire corporate world of competing manufacturers with different goals and ideals — as well as of course designs — is presented to provide gamemasters with a rich tapestry of backdrops and plot hooks, as well as to give players more flavorful companions then just a string of letters and numbers for their robotic buddies.

When Kiel Howell looked over the Starfinder Roleplaying Game rulesbook we had access to, he realized that somewhere beyond the playable race of the android and the mechanic-only "drone" there needed to be a system for a more "equipment-like" version for little robot sidekicks!

He also created five different competing companies to manufacture all of his 100+ pre-made robots:

But there are full rules for you to create your own little robot sidekicks, including 3 pages of add-ons (here are just two!)

So we hope you'll check out our Cosmic Odyssey line, let us know what you think of it, and what you'd like to see next from that wide, crazy universe out there?

Lucus Palosaari on DriveThruRPGFacebookTwitterGoogle+ & LinkedIn -- and now on Amazon!

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